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Marketing Case Study: Athletic Apparel

In Advertising News on March 9, 2011 by PALO creative Tagged: , , , , , , , , , ,

Marketing is all about getting you to buy into something; make you believe that a product or company is, well, awesome. That the product or company will make your life easier, add value to your business, or just be fun and enjoyable. A really good commercial can talk you into buying something or convince you to switch over to the advertised product or service. Some people are easy to reach, while others need more than a “9 out of 10 doctors recommend it” endorsement. But sometimes, it’s just about taking the opposite approach in your advertising that grabs those skeptics.

Enter: Reebok Easytone and ZigTech.

The ad is simple; it focuses on girls’ backsides as they go about their everyday business. The message: a claim that it tones your legs more than regular tennis shoes. Reebok made commercials that showed study findings to try and prove exactly how much harder your legs would work, as well as the typical fitness ads that feature really in-shape women.

While other athletic gear companies focus their ads on blood, sweat and tears, Reebok seems to be focusing on “fun.” It seems to be paying off, too. Reebok sales grew 12% to about $2.6 billion in 2010. In 2010, the brand sold about 10 million pairs of EasyTone and 2 million pairs of ZigTech.

Reebok just announced it is planning on dumping money into advertising its new innovative workout gear, with two new global campaigns. In 2010, the athletic brand nearly tripled its measured media spending in the U.S. to $75.7 million, with $38 million devoted to ZigTech and $31 million to EasyTone. It’s a major shift from the year before, when the Reebok brand spent $27.6 million, according to Kantar. And in 2008 the brand spent only $8.2 million.

Do you take your marketing on the road most traveled and try to do it better, or less traveled and try to be different? Just for the record, Reebok Easytone running shoes really do live up to their claims.

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